The supposed irrationality or illogic of Christianity is one of the major themes in cases made by atheists or skeptics. These issues are also faced by the many believers who find themselves seriously pondering the questions and mysteries of the faith.

Some of the most common examples are apparent contradictions like the omnipotence paradox (“can God create a rock so heavy that He can’t lift it?”), as well as reasonable questions like, “if God is really omnipotent, omniscient, and truly benevolent, why do atrocities happen to good people?”

These, however, are far from being the most incomprehensible and irrational elements in the Christian belief system.

If you really want to point out the biggest thing about the faith that makes the least amount of sense—the single most irrational thing about Christianity—there’s only one real contender.

And that’s what I’m diving into in the latest video.

 

 

-Ezekiel

 

 

Most Christians, by default, view temptation as a bad thing. An annoyance, a problem, or even a terrible affliction.

It seems to be natural for us to wish that temptation would just go away and disappear forever. Then we wouldn’t have to worry about it.

The fact is, that’s not going to happen any time soon. And we’re better off changing our own thinking, rather than sitting around wishing for our circumstances to change.

So let’s ask a weird question:

Is temptation necessarily a bad thing?

 

In my latest video, I shed some light on a radically different way to view temptation. This viewpoint is the reason I often look forward to confronting temptation, instead of dreading it.

 

I recognize this is an odd topic, and I’d love to hear what you think about it. Let me know your take in the comments, on social media, or email:

Gab: https://gab.ai/Brohoshaphat

Twitter: https://twitter.com/BrohoshaphatG

Discord: https://discord.gg/w4ZdcEg

Email: brohoshaphat@gmail.com

-Ezekiel

 

 

In September of 2017, I finally made the jump. I quit my job and went fully into business for myself.

I had figured it would probably take a couple months to really get into the swing of things and replace my income. I was mistaken.

Over half a year later, I still wasn’t doing well. My savings were bleeding out. I wasn’t hitting my goals. I still had time, but I didn’t have any firm indication that I was really on my way to true, gainful self-employment.

The entire time, it felt like there was a mental and emotional barrier stopping me from getting into gear and taking myself seriously. But I couldn’t quantify it or figure it out. I felt like there was just something wrong with me.

One day, it finally hit me. I was carrying an old weight from my childhood. I was still blaming myself for something that I had already walked away from years ago.

If I felt like I was “in the dark”, it was because I was living in a shadow of the past.

In this video, I talk about how greed poisoned me as a child, and how the after-effects of that poison continued to hold me down well into my adulthood.

Then I’ll talk about how I finally confronted my past and forgave myself, allowing me to work more confidently toward the life I’ve wanted to live.

 

-Ezekiel