When you’re struggling with certain sins, it’s easy to start seeing relationship with God as a way to get out of that sin and change your life for the better.

This is true in some ways. God is the solution to sin. Investing in our relationship with Him does help us get free and living according to His will.

However, if that’s the purpose of your relationship with God—if that’s the main reason you want to take Him more seriously, that could be a huge problem. Because God is not a means to an end.

The purpose of our relationship with God isn’t to enable us to resist sin, or achieve some other goal. Rather, the reason we resist sin is so that we can more fully give our lives to God.

It seems to be a subtle difference on the surface. But it’s a crucial one.

In the latest video, I dig in deeper on this and tell about some of my own shortfalls in this area.

 

 

If you’re interested in the book I briefly referred to in this video, you can find it here: Killing Kryptonite by John Bevere.

-Ezekiel

 

 

The supposed irrationality or illogic of Christianity is one of the major themes in cases made by atheists or skeptics. These issues are also faced by the many believers who find themselves seriously pondering the questions and mysteries of the faith.

Some of the most common examples are apparent contradictions like the omnipotence paradox (“can God create a rock so heavy that He can’t lift it?”), as well as reasonable questions like, “if God is really omnipotent, omniscient, and truly benevolent, why do atrocities happen to good people?”

These, however, are far from being the most incomprehensible and irrational elements in the Christian belief system.

If you really want to point out the biggest thing about the faith that makes the least amount of sense—the single most irrational thing about Christianity—there’s only one real contender.

And that’s what I’m diving into in the latest video.

 

 

-Ezekiel

 

 

Most Christians, by default, view temptation as a bad thing. An annoyance, a problem, or even a terrible affliction.

It seems to be natural for us to wish that temptation would just go away and disappear forever. Then we wouldn’t have to worry about it.

The fact is, that’s not going to happen any time soon. And we’re better off changing our own thinking, rather than sitting around wishing for our circumstances to change.

So let’s ask a weird question:

Is temptation necessarily a bad thing?

 

In my latest video, I shed some light on a radically different way to view temptation. This viewpoint is the reason I often look forward to confronting temptation, instead of dreading it.

 

I recognize this is an odd topic, and I’d love to hear what you think about it. Let me know your take in the comments, on social media, or email:

Gab: https://gab.ai/Brohoshaphat

Twitter: https://twitter.com/BrohoshaphatG

Discord: https://discord.gg/w4ZdcEg

Email: brohoshaphat@gmail.com

-Ezekiel

 

 

From time to time, I’ll speak with men who have reached a discouraging point in their battle against some vice, like porn.

I’ve been at this same discouraging point myself at times.

It’s best described as, “feeling guilty for not feeling guilty.”

We fail. Over. And over. And over again.

At first, we feel guilt for our failures. And it is fitting that we do.

After all, we’ve betrayed God. Right in front of His face, no less.

We have—even if in secret—let down the people who look up to us.

We’ve failed our current or future spouses.

We sabotage ourselves, and slowly kill off the person we were created to be.

And so we feel guilt.

But, eventually, we grow numb. We get used to the sting of failure. And our feelings of guilt cease.

This can be alarming and discouraging. For some of us, guilt was a key driving force behind our efforts to change. What will we do without it?

The video below explains how to handle this situation, as well as the overall role of feelings (like guilt) in your life as a man.

 

-Ezekiel

 

 

Today, I’d like to talk about some important truths regarding what it really means to be a Christian.

Many people have an unspoken idea in the back of their heads—that there is time for God, and then time for yourself. Some of your hours are “God time”, and some of your hours are “me time”.

This is a misunderstanding, and it can sometimes carry significant consequences for the believer.

In this video, I talk about what it means to be a Christian man, and the responsibilities that come with that role.

 

-Ezekiel

 

 

It’s natural to feel a sense of shame when you fail and relapse into sin.

But when this shame stops us from immediately turning to God in repentance, it becomes an enormous problem. When we feel like we can’t return to God until we straighten out our behavior on our own, we become trapped.

That’s because we could never free ourselves. We need God to wash us clean.

In this video, I talk about escaping this shame and running immediately to God, as well as the magnitude of God’s love for us and what Christ really has accomplished.

 

-Ezekiel